david:

Yay, Liba!!

david:

Yay, Liba!!





kateoplis:

“Portland has taken hold of the cultural imagination as, to borrow the tag line from “Portlandia,” the place where young people go to retire. And for good reason: The city has nearly all the perks that economists suggest lead to a high quality of life — coastlines, mountains, mild winters and summers, restaurants, cultural institutions and clean air. (Fortunately, college-educated people don’t value sunshine as much as they used to.) Portland also has qualities that are less tangible but still likely to attract young people these days, like a politically open culture that supports gay rights and the legalization of marijuana — in addition to the right of way for unicyclists or the ability to marry in a 24/7 doughnut shop. “It’s really captured the zeitgeist of the age in a way that no other small city in America ever has,” said Aaron Renn, an urban-affairs analyst who writes the Urbanophile blog. According to professors from Portland State University, the city has been able to attract and retain young college-educated people at the second-highest rate in the nation. (Louisville, Ky., is No. 1.)”
“Portland… has more highly educated people than it knows what to do with. Portland is not a corporate town, as its neighbors Seattle and San Francisco have become. While there are employment opportunities in the outdoor-apparel business (Nike, Adidas and Columbia Sportswear are all nearby) or the semiconductor industry (Intel has a large presence in Hillsboro), most workers have far fewer opportunities. According to Renn, personal income per capita in the city grew by a mere 31 percent between 2000 and 2012, slower than 42 other cities, including Grand Rapids, Mich., and Rochester. And yet people still keep showing up. “People move to New York to be in media or finance; they move to L.A. to be in show business,” Renn said. “People move to Portland to move to Portland.””
Will Portland Always Be a Retirement Community for the Young

kateoplis:

Portland has taken hold of the cultural imagination as, to borrow the tag line from “Portlandia,” the place where young people go to retire. And for good reason: The city has nearly all the perks that economists suggest lead to a high quality of life — coastlines, mountains, mild winters and summers, restaurants, cultural institutions and clean air. (Fortunately, college-educated people don’t value sunshine as much as they used to.) Portland also has qualities that are less tangible but still likely to attract young people these days, like a politically open culture that supports gay rights and the legalization of marijuana — in addition to the right of way for unicyclists or the ability to marry in a 24/7 doughnut shop. “It’s really captured the zeitgeist of the age in a way that no other small city in America ever has,” said Aaron Renn, an urban-affairs analyst who writes the Urbanophile blog. According to professors from Portland State University, the city has been able to attract and retain young college-educated people at the second-highest rate in the nation. (Louisville, Ky., is No. 1.)”

Portland… has more highly educated people than it knows what to do with. Portland is not a corporate town, as its neighbors Seattle and San Francisco have become. While there are employment opportunities in the outdoor-apparel business (Nike, Adidas and Columbia Sportswear are all nearby) or the semiconductor industry (Intel has a large presence in Hillsboro), most workers have far fewer opportunities. According to Renn, personal income per capita in the city grew by a mere 31 percent between 2000 and 2012, slower than 42 other cities, including Grand Rapids, Mich., and Rochester. And yet people still keep showing up. “People move to New York to be in media or finance; they move to L.A. to be in show business,” Renn said. “People move to Portland to move to Portland.””

Will Portland Always Be a Retirement Community for the Young


I’ve never seen any life transformation that didn’t begin with the person in question finally getting tired of their own bullshit.
Elizabeth Gilbert (via kateoplis)

(via kmgrace)


kmgrace:

dek-says-so:

abbyjean:

Charts from OKCupid, showing how straight women and men rate each other based on ages. For women, the men they find most attractive are roughly their own age. For men, the women they find most attractive are roughly the same age - 20 to 23 - regardless of the age of the man. (538)

Good fucking Christ.

As if I couldn’t be more depressed about online dating. FML.

Interesting


Wearing overalls in homage to Angela Chase and Lindsey Weir, but inspired by KBell in that new Samsung Ad.

Wearing overalls in homage to Angela Chase and Lindsey Weir, but inspired by KBell in that new Samsung Ad.


imsirius:

"There are things that come along with getting older. You get really good at not taking things personally. When you see people acting or behaving a certain way, you don’t do what you did in your 20s, which is assume it’s because of something you did or there’s something wrong with you. You just watch it the way you would watch a child having a tantrum." x x

(via 2x04)


latenightseth:

Seth taught Bill Hader all sorts of things during their time together at SNL


I’m told there are over 100 employees working in the Century City Apple Store today.

I’m told there are over 100 employees working in the Century City Apple Store today.





10 Books That Have Stayed With You

I like internet trends so I am in on this. Here is the challenge I received from kmgrace - challenge extended to emilyluger libawr ryanpasse stamos howtodayis reallytiredgirl pesha

List 10 books that stayed with you in some way. Don’t think too hard. They don’t have to be the “right” books or great books of literature, just ones that affected you in some way. Tag 10 friends including me so I can see your list. (or don’t)

This is in no particular order for me- just the top books I think of- 

1- Pillars of the Earth- Ken Follett (this book taught me that the smartest people always win)

2- Bel Canto- Ann Patchett (“Part of the price of admission is the privilege to wait in a beautiful space.” - I think of this every single time I walk in to a theater)

3- Devil in a White City- Erik Larson (helped make me comfortable with my slytherin ways- and be inspired by how cities were created) 

4- History of Love- Nicole Krauss (will re-read anytime it is near me and feel my heart grow)

5- Game of Thrones-  George RR Martin (these books taught me that the smartest people do not always win)

6- East Of Eden- John Steinbeck (the human evil in this still terrifies me)

7- Poisonwood Bible - Barbra Kingsolver (I blame my continuous fascination with race and class and privilege on reading this book at a young age)

8- World According to Garp- John Irving (that car scene will haunt me forever)

9- Rich Boy- Sharon Pomerantz (too close to home)

10- Interpreter of Maladies- Juhmpa Lahiri (the world is a big and a small place and I want to see as much of it as I can)